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Creator Spotlight: WeekdayWeekend

Joseph_L

Administrator
Staff member
Introducing the "Weekday Weekend" YouTube channel: a unique space where the weekend never ends! This channel brings the relaxation and joy of weekend hobbies into every day, featuring engaging content on CAD, 3D printing, and fun-filled gaming sessions. Dive into their notable projects, including detailed CAD tutorials and innovative 3D printing endeavors, all presented with a casual, friendly vibe. Whether you're into creative design or looking for gaming camaraderie, "Weekday Weekend" promises a welcoming community and endless inspiration. For a deeper dive into their world, check out their official website.

Adam is the man behind the platform, a jack of all trades from Michigan. Adam doesn’t just spend his time 3D printing or playing games, he also does graphic design, writing and playing music, white collar hacking and more! Adam especially enjoys Stardew Valley and To the Moon.

You can connect with Adam in a number of ways, including:

Offiicial Website: weekdayweekend.net

Discord: discord.gg/wNEjRk5Geu

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@WeekdayWeekend

Twitch: twitch.tv/weekdayweekend

Adam is also here, and feel free to ask him anything on this thread.

Have a great day everyone!
 

JimCad

Senior Member
Commodore 16
&
Atari 520 for me.

Then the Casio fx 720P 4K memory where I taught myself to write all sorts of stuff to help with my old Fanuc 5T CNC Lathe.
Then in the 1990's the Psion palm top.
:):);)
Ah the good old days.

Jim
FX 720P.JPG
 

Mibe

Alibre Super User
Commodore 16
&
Atari 520 for me.

Then the Casio fx 720P 4K memory where I taught myself to write all sorts of stuff to help with my old Fanuc 5T CNC Lathe.
Then in the 1990's the Psion palm top.
:):);)
Ah the good old days.

Jim
View attachment 41029

I collect stuff like that - old computers, video games and calculators. I had the Casio FX-602P in High School and used that a lot for programming as well.

Those day were the best, when different brands did different stuff and nothing was compatible :)
 

JimCad

Senior Member
I collect stuff like that - old computers, video games and calculators. I had the Casio FX-602P in High School and used that a lot for programming as well.

Those day were the best, when different brands did different stuff and nothing was compatible :)
A few years ago I "went off on one"
I bought quite a few of the Casio fx 720P & Casio fx 850p
After a few years I decided that I'll have died of old age before they have any value so I gave them to my Son
Had a Commodore 64 and a Spectrum ZX16 too which he now has.

Jim
 

Stu3d

Senior Member
Never forget the day my mum brought a Sinclair ZX81 home,
What did you buy that for? 10 print "Hello". 20 goto 10... never looked back!
Commodore 64 as well.
 

JimCad

Senior Member
On the commodore16 (mid 1980's)
I wrote a very short program to create randomly spaced circles,
Random round or ellipse,
Random size of circles or ellipse,
Random number of times before cleaning the screen and starting again.
As I didn't even have a calculator at school and failed just about everything they gave me and as I was self taught I was delighted with myself. :D
Ahhhh the good old days. :)
Happy memories.
 

Mibe

Alibre Super User
Also my first contact with 3D "CAD". Sinclair Spectrum in 1983... A few years later other 3D CAD on Atari ST. Life was easier then :)

maxresdefault.jpg
 

Joseph_L

Administrator
Staff member
Also my first contact with 3D "CAD". Sinclair Spectrum in 1983... A few years later other 3D CAD on Atari ST. Life was easier then :)

maxresdefault.jpg
I love seeing things like this, thank you for sharing. It's great to think about how far CAD has come.
 
I'm going to be doing a video on why I think more people should learn (at least the basics of using) CAD. I'm going to relate it to learning the basics of computer programming, as was done in the 80s and 90s when a lot of math textbooks also taught Microsoft BASIC.
One of my biggest arguments is the amount of 3D printers making it into average homes these days, and how similarly to having your own woodshop, knowing how to use CAD could assist you in fixing problems around the house on your own, as opposed to needing to go to the store and buy replacement parts.

So my question to everyone here is: what other reasons would it benefit the layperson to learn the basics of CAD?
 
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silver2row

Member
@Weekdayweekend ,

Layman to the fullest over here. I say these are qualities that will inevitably have entry level learning associated with their ideas.

1. Looking to branch out of regular building of "tinkering."
2. Maker movements looking to build upon their reluctant way of associating people with things.

Those are reasons for people.

Learning the basics of CAD is detrimental to basic building upon already understood entries into our learnings.

1. Learning complicated Graphic Programs help people who like to build.
2. In general, I say people like to build upon what they know.
3. So say, I had built Lincoln Logs and wanted to grow out of childhood into CAD usage for civic engineering and/or structural design...

Number 3. would be a childhood "build upon" for years to come without giving up.

Oh! Benefits...

1. I think it benefits me.
2. Way much so, I can alter actual blocks of building slowly to organize the complication into individual parts to 3D Print or make into actual items.
3. Like me, mowing and such for actual work is boring. It is labor intensive and creates for poor minded days. It is a relief to come home to learn more about what the CAD programs have to offer.
4. The mind growth in some people need extra attention. It is not always easy to build, stay with building, and then ultimately come to completion regularly on such builds, i.e. especially not through time.
5. So, with me as an example here, while the mundane task of trivial-labor intensive work infuriates body parts and a clear mindset, being able to complete projects that are mentally trying help.

Seth

P.S. Some ideas there... The ideas I give may or may not be true. The reason they may not be true are these ideas: I do not speak for the general public, I am not popular, and people do not listen to me because I have to make it clear that I dislike orders from the first person. I rarely give orders and it is known by myself and others around me, i.e. friendlies and hated accomplices. So, an easier route of explanation would be because, "All the times I could have built that on my own and I hired out."
 

Ex Machina

Senior Member
I'm going to be doing a video on why I think more people should learn (at least the basics of using) CAD. I'm going to relate it to learning the basics of computer programming, as was done in the 80s and 90s when a lot of math textbooks also taught Microsoft BASIC.
One of my biggest arguments is the amount of 3D printers making it into average homes these days, and how similarly to having your own woodshop, knowing how to use CAD could assist you in fixing problems around the house on your own, as opposed to needing to go to the store and buy replacement parts.

So my question to everyone here is: what other reasons would it benefit the layperson to learn the basics of CAD?
The biggest reason I can think of is the ubiquity of 3D printing. When you learn CAD to the extend that you can translate your ideas, at least in some form, into a 3D model and the print it you get immense satisfaction! And that satisfaction becomes addictive and you want to create more and more.

Imagine now if you buy a small hobby CNC and start making things out of metal. You feel like you rule the world man...
 

silver2row

Member
and yes...that is more to the point. @Ex Machina , I think you summed up what exactly I was conveying. I did it poorly. You were precise. Thank you.

It is really about making things oneself. I remember looking for hours on end for 3D Prints to make before coming across Alibre and others. It is such a pain to rely on others all the time, i.e. especially in the building/making of fine tuned parts. 3D Printing is fun and can be a catalyst for future endeavors like with what you described. Either a lathe or mill would be, in the hobby CNC world, a perfect way to try things out "in real life."

For instance...my pitfall was my last bolt I made for the 3D Print. I made it 20mm but it came out a little larger that exactly 20mm.

Although fun and productive to see it being made, I will not or never see the day of light until it is made via lathe. I need other things to make other items in life. Simple commands bring about joy in peoples' lives like mine!

Seth

P.S. Also, I cannot wait to build my first sign. If it is possible with lettering, good. If not, I can always try another route.
 
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